Beef in the Classroom grant program impacts nearly 6,000 students

WI Beef Council
The Wisconsin Beef Council received 93 grant applications, reaching 5,794 students. In total, WBC granted $12,394 to continue beef education.

The Wisconsin Beef Council helped teachers incorporate beef products into high school curriculum across the state as part of its annual Beef in the Classroom Grant Program for the 2020-2021 school year.

“It is crucial to provide these students with the resources they need to understand how beef can play a role in their everyday lives,” Angie Horkan, Wisconsin Beef Council director of marketing, said. “We are proud to offer these grants to stimulate conversations about raising beef, utilizing the product, and finding careers in the industry.”

Focused on high school Family & Consumer Science and Agriculture classes, this program helps teachers strengthen their lessons about lean beef selection, storage, preparation, and nutrition by having funds available to buy and prepare beef with their students.

The Wisconsin Beef Council (WBC) received 93 grant applications, reaching 5,794 students. In total, WBC granted $12,394 to continue beef education.

The Northland Pines School District used various cuts of beef from Eye of Round Roast to Ground Burger to help students understand how to purchase beef. “The resources allowed them to look at beef in a different light, not just an overwhelming multitude of wrapped beef with varying prices in the grocery store,” educator Nicole Garrison said.

“This went hand-in-hand with my cooking methods unit. The resources made it applicable to their futures. I really appreciate the funding to give them hands-on experiences!”

The Wisconsin Beef Council helped teachers incorporate beef products into high school curriculum across the state as part of its annual Beef in the Classroom Grant Program.

Lisa Jagielo with Unity High School said she used the grant to purchase organic, grass-fed, 93 percent lean, and other styles of Ground Beef to prepare meatballs. Then, students were encouraged to sample each kind and record any differences in flavor.

“This program makes a huge difference for schools,” Jagielo said. “Budgets are tight, so this generous grant funding makes an impact that is to be noted.”

Educators also noted the grant gave students opportunities to try new cuts such as Tenderloin and New York Strip Steak, turning their taste buds toward beef.

The grant reimburses teachers between $100-$300 per school each year depending upon class size. Senior High School Family and Consumer Science Classrooms, Senior High School Agriculture Education Classrooms, and Senior High School STEM Classrooms are eligible to apply during the grant application period.