Wautoma, WI
Current Conditions
0:56 AM CST
Partly Cloudy
Temperature
34°F
Dew Point
32°F
Humidity
92%
Wind
SE at 6 mph
Barometer
29.89 in. F
Visibility
4.00 mi.
Sunrise
07:29 a.m.
Sunset
04:22 p.m.
Morning Forecast (7:00am-12:00pm)
Temperatures will range from 32 to 35 degrees with mostly cloudy skies. Winds will remain steady around 10 miles per hour from the southeast. No precipitation is expected.
7-Day Forecast
Monday
37°F / 32°F
Light Rain/Snow
Tuesday
36°F / 31°F
Light Rain/Snow
Wednesday
33°F / 22°F
Mostly Cloudy
Thursday
31°F / 22°F
Mostly Cloudy
Friday
33°F / 28°F
Mostly Cloudy
Saturday
29°F / 6°F
Partly Cloudy
Sunday
19°F / 6°F
Mostly Cloudy
Detailed Short Term Forecast
Issued at 0:56 AM CST
Monday...Temperatures will range from a high of 37 to a low of 32 degrees with cloudy skies. Winds will range between 10 and 17 miles per hour from the east. 0.26 inches of rain are expected. Less than 1 inch of snow is possible.
This Afternoon ...Temperatures will range from 37 to 32 degrees with cloudy skies. Winds will remain steady around 12 miles per hour from the east. Rain amounts of less than a tenth of an inch are expected. Snow accumulation of less than a half inch is predicted.
This Evening ...Temperatures will range from 32 to 34 degrees with cloudy skies. Winds will remain steady around 12 miles per hour from the east. Rain amounts between a tenth and quarter of an inch are predicted. Snow accumulation of less than a half inch is predicted.
Overnight ...Temperatures will remain steady at 34 degrees with cloudy skies. Winds will range between 11 and 17 miles per hour from the northeast. Rain amounts of less than a tenth of an inch are expected.
Tuesday...Temperatures will range from a high of 36 to a low of 31 degrees with mostly cloudy skies. Winds will range between 8 and 19 miles per hour from the northnorthwest. 0.23 inches of rain are expected. 1.00 inch of snow is expected.

PDPW Transition Cow Workshops set

March 17, 2014 | 0 comments

JUNEAU

The most significant time in a dairy cow's milk production cycle is the weeks leading up to, and following, the birth of a calf. Professional Dairy Producers of Wisconsin (PDPW) will offer two, one-day workshops on helping cows in this important transitional period.

"Challenges and Solutions for the Transition Cow" will be held in two locations:

■ Tuesday, March 25, at the Iowa Dairy Center, 1527 Hwy. 150 S. in Calmar, Iowa. This program is being held collaboratively with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach, and the Northeast Iowa Dairy Foundation.

■· The workshop will be repeated on Wednesday, March 26, at the Arlington Research Station, N695 Hopkins Road, Arlington, WI.

In both locations, registration begins at 9:30 a.m., followed by five presentations featuring today's leading dairy scientists who will address the physiological, metabolic and nutritional challenges faced by transition cows. The speakers and topics include:

· "Reducing Transition Cow Mortality," presented by Dr. Frank Garry, professor at Colorado State University, Department of Clinical Sciences. The risk of cow loss is highest during the transition period, and Dr. Garry will share an improved approach to diagnosis and information management. He'll explain how paying attention to causes of transition cow health problems can create changes that substantially decrease losses in your herd.

· "Pen Movement during the Transition Period" presented by Dr. Ric Grummer, Emeritus Professor, Department of Dairy Science, University of Wisconsin-Madison, and also Ruminant Technical Director for Balchem. As cows progress from the dry period to early lactation, they are typically moved at least once, which can induce stress. Dr. Grummer will present recent research that examines the consequences of moving transition cows and tips and tricks that can make a difference on every dairy farm.

·" Postpartum: The Crucial Three Weeks," also be presented by Dr. Ric Grummer. Feeding the cow during the post-fresh transition period, when dairy cows may experience large energy and protein deficits, is as critical as during the dry period. Dr. Grummer will discuss strategies to help meet nutrient deficits during the early postpartum period.

· "Moving Down Cows," presented by Dr. Robert Leder, a practicing veterinarian in Bear Creek and Clintonville, Wis. While down cows are a reality of dairy farming, having a plan in place protects both animals and people on your dairy farm. Dr. Leder will review basic principles and share protocols to increase cow comfort, as well as improve the outcome of non-ambulatory cows. Dr. Leder is currently the chair of the Large Animal Welfare subcommittee of the Wisconsin Veterinary Medical Association.

· "Keeping Transition Cows Cool," with Dr. Ric Grummer. While investments to cool lactating cows are warranted, Dr. Grummer will review the importance of cooling dry cows and address the benefits of investing in equipment or feeding strategies to cool dry cows.

These interactive workshops will include question-and-answer sessions with the speakers. Lunch is also included. For a detailed brochure or to register, visit www.pdpw.org, or call 800-947-7379.

Dairy science and veterinary professionals attending PDPW's Transition Cow Workshops can receive continuing education credits through the University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine, as well as through ARPAS, the American Registry of Professional Animal Scientists.

"Challenges and Solutions for the Transition Cow" will be held in two locations:

■ Tuesday, March 25, at the Iowa Dairy Center, 1527 Hwy. 150 S. in Calmar, IA.

■· Wednesday, March 26, at the Arlington Research Station, N695 Hopkins Road, Arlington, WI.

This site uses Facebook comments to make it easier for you to contribute. If you see a comment you would like to flag for spam or abuse, click the "x" in the upper right of it. By posting, you agree to our Terms of Use.

Page Tools

Search

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement