Wautoma, WI
Current Conditions
0:56 AM CDT
Clear
Temperature
76°F
Dew Point
54°F
Humidity
47%
Wind
SSW at 6 mph
Barometer
30.01 in. F
Visibility
10.00 mi.
Sunrise
05:36 a.m.
Sunset
08:30 p.m.
Evening Forecast (7:00pm-Midnight)
Temperatures will range from 79 to 58 degrees with partly cloudy skies. Winds will remain steady around 6 miles per hour from the south. No precipitation is expected.
7-Day Forecast
Thursday
79°F / 54°F
Light Rain
Friday
81°F / 58°F
Mostly Cloudy
Saturday
86°F / 61°F
Partly Cloudy
Sunday
74°F / 49°F
Scattered Showers
Monday
70°F / 49°F
Sunny
Tuesday
74°F / 51°F
Sunny
Wednesday
78°F / 55°F
Partly Cloudy
Detailed Short Term Forecast
Issued at 0:56 AM CDT
Thursday...Temperatures will range from a high of 79 to a low of 54 degrees with mostly cloudy skies. Winds will range between 5 and 8 miles per hour from the south. No precipitation is expected.
Overnight ...Temperatures will range from 57 to 54 degrees with mostly cloudy skies. Winds will remain steady around 7 miles per hour from the south.
Friday...Temperatures will range from a high of 81 to a low of 58 degrees with mostly cloudy skies. Winds will range between 9 and 13 miles per hour from the southsouthwest. Less than 1 tenth inch of rain is possible.

Indiana crops

close to being a total loss

Aug. 9, 2012 | 0 comments

Purdue University agricultural experts say crops are just weeks away from being total losses unless significant rainfall occurs.

Some crops already are beyond saving.

Only nine percent of the state's corn crop is considered good to excellent. That's down from 41 percent this time last year.

The damage to the corn crop has raised concerns about how to feed cattle whose pastures are in poor condition.

Some farmers are considering cutting their corn crops to use as cattle feed after getting just one good cutting of hay or alfalfa this year.

Hay prices have doubled, and alfalfa in the Lawrence County area is running $12 for a 60-pound bale, Purdue Extension Educator Jim Luzar told the Tribune-Star.

But the lack of moisture in corn plants has caused lethal levels of nitrate to accumulate. The failed crops must be harvested as silage and allowed to ferment so the nitrate dissipates in order to be safe, Luzar said.

Luzar said it's a tough position for farmers who were sitting pretty in May after enjoying good weather that allowed them to get crops in the ground earlier than usual.

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