Wautoma, WI
Current Conditions
0:56 AM CDT
Cloudy
Temperature
61°F
Dew Point
60°F
Humidity
96%
Wind
CM at 0 mph
Barometer
29.95 in. F
Visibility
10.00 mi.
Sunrise
06:16 a.m.
Sunset
07:38 p.m.
Overnight Forecast (Midnight-7:00am)
Temperatures will range from 61 to 65 degrees with cloudy skies. Winds will range between 2 and 7 miles per hour from the east. No precipitation is expected.
7-Day Forecast
Friday
66°F / 61°F
Light Rain
Friday
86°F / 65°F
Light Rain
Saturday
76°F / 61°F
Partly Cloudy
Sunday
80°F / 61°F
Scattered Showers
Monday
77°F / 56°F
Scattered Showers
Tuesday
78°F / 56°F
Scattered Showers
Wednesday
78°F / 61°F
Scattered Showers
Detailed Short Term Forecast
Issued at 0:56 AM CDT
Friday...Temperatures will range from a high of 66 to a low of 61 degrees with cloudy skies. Winds will range between 2 and 7 miles per hour from the east. Less than 1 tenth inch of rain is possible.
...$dailyWea.get(0).segments.get($o).statement
Overnight ...Temperatures will range from 61 to 65 degrees with cloudy skies. Winds will range between 2 and 7 miles per hour from the east. No precipitation is expected.
Friday...Temperatures will range from a high of 86 to a low of 65 degrees with mostly cloudy skies. Winds will range between 0 and 18 miles per hour from the south. 0.83 inches of rain are expected.

Drought accelerates
use of drugs to beef up cattle

May 23, 2013 | 0 comments

Cattle feeders in the U.S. are coping with smaller herds and high corn costs in part by using more growth-inducing drugs designed to bulk up animals and get more beef from each carcass.

Accelerated use of the drugs, known as "beta-agonists," is defended by producers who say they are essential to withstanding the drought. Their pharmaceutical creators insist the additives are safe.

Their use is drawing new scrutiny both at home and abroad. Russia and other key markets have banned them. Some domestic producers worry about the potential effects on tenderness and flavor.

In February, Russia joined the European Union and China in banning beef raised on the additives.

The United States blames politics for the export bans. But some U.S. consumer groups are taking notice.

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