Wautoma, WI
Current Conditions
0:03 AM CDT
Partly Cloudy
Temperature
73°F
Dew Point
64°F
Humidity
73%
Wind
VRB at 3 mph
Barometer
29.86 in. F
Visibility
10.00 mi.
Sunrise
06:06 a.m.
Sunset
07:53 p.m.
Morning Forecast (7:00am-12:00pm)
Temperatures will range from 59 to 72 degrees with partly cloudy skies. Winds will remain steady around 7 miles per hour from the northwest. No precipitation is expected.
7-Day Forecast
Wednesday
77°F / 59°F
Partly Cloudy
Thursday
80°F / 62°F
Light Rain
Friday
87°F / 67°F
Light Rain
Saturday
75°F / 68°F
Light Rain
Sunday
83°F / 68°F
Light Rain
Monday
80°F / 64°F
Light Rain
Tuesday
79°F / 64°F
Light Rain
Detailed Short Term Forecast
Issued at 0:03 AM CDT
Wednesday...Temperatures will range from a high of 77 to a low of 59 degrees with partly cloudy skies. Winds will range between 4 and 9 miles per hour from the westnorthwest. No precipitation is expected.
This Afternoon ...Temperatures will range from 74 to 77 degrees with partly cloudy skies. Winds will remain steady around 6 miles per hour from the northwest. No precipitation is expected.
This Evening ...Temperatures will range from 75 to 62 degrees with clear skies. Winds will remain steady around 5 miles per hour from the east. No precipitation is expected.
Overnight ...Temperatures will range from 62 to 60 degrees with mostly cloudy skies. Winds will remain steady around 6 miles per hour from the east. No precipitation is expected.
Thursday...Temperatures will range from a high of 80 to a low of 62 degrees with mostly cloudy skies. Winds will range between 5 and 11 miles per hour from the east. 0.94 inches of rain are expected.

USDA seeks allies to protect soil, water

June 2, 2014 | 0 comments

TRAVERSE CITY, MI (AP)

The U.S. Department of Agriculture is teaming with businesses, nonprofits and others on a five-year, $2.4 billion program that will fund locally-designed soil and water conservation projects nationwide, said Secretary Tom Vilsack.

Authorized by the new farm law enacted earlier this year, the Regional Conservation Partnership Program is intended to involve the private sector more directly in planning and funding environmental protection initiatives tied to agriculture.

"It's a new approach to conservation that is really going to encourage people to think in very innovative and creative ways," Vilsack said.

He described the projects to be funded as "clean water start-up operations" that will benefit communities and watersheds, a departure from the department's more traditional approach of focusing on individual operators adopting practices such as no-till cultivation or planting buffer strips to prevent runoff into streams.

Universities, local and tribal governments, companies and sporting groups are among those eligible to devise plans and seek grants.

"By establishing new public-private partnerships, we can have an impact that's well beyond what the federal government could accomplish on its own," Vilsack said. "These efforts keep our land resilient and water clean, and promote tremendous economic growth in agriculture, construction, tourism and outdoor recreation and other industries."

In addition to protecting the environment, the projects will bolster the rural economy by supporting tourism and outdoor recreation jobs while avoiding pollution that would cost more to clean up, he said.

USDA will spend $1.2 billion — including $400 million the first year — and raise an equal amount from participants. Successful applications will include offers of cash, labor or other contributions, as well as plans for achieving measurable solutions and using new approaches, said Jason Weller, chief of the Natural Resources Conservation Service.

Vilsack announced the program in Michigan, home state of Senate Agriculture Committee Chairwoman Debbie Stabenow, primary writer of the farm bill with Rep. Frank Lucas of Oklahoma. They held a news conference in Bay City near Lake Huron's Saginaw Bay, where nutrient runoff from croplands causes algae blooms that degrade water quality.

Stabenow said she expected the area to generate several funding proposals.

Kellogg Co. is working with The Nature Conservancy on a project designed to reduce runoff in the Saginaw Bay watershed, said Diane Holdorf, the cereal company's chief sustainability officer. Kellogg, based in Battle Creek, buys wheat for its cereals from farms in the area.

The program establishes three pots of money for grants. Thirty-five percent of total funding will be divided among "critical" areas including the Great Lakes; the Chesapeake Bay watershed; the Columbia, Colorado and Mississippi river basins; the Longleaf Pine Range; prairie grasslands; and the California Bay Delta.

Additionally, 40 percent will go to regional or multi-state projects selected on a competitive basis and 25 percent to state-level projects.

The California Rice Commission plans to seek funding of initiatives to expand water bird habitat in flooded Central Valley rice fields, said Paul Buttner, manager of environmental affairs. Rice farms are an indispensable waterfowl refuge because most of the original wetlands have been developed, he said.

Working with the USDA and other partners, the rice commission has developed practices that can make fields more hospitable for birds, such as draining them more gradually ahead of planting season and building nesting islands, Buttner said. The new program could attract more participants, he added.

The New Mexico Association of Conservation Districts will develop proposals for combating invasive plants that suck too much water from the ground and ranching practices that could slow the depletion of the Ogallala Aquifer, said Executive Director Debbie Hughes.

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