Wautoma, WI
Current Conditions
0:56 AM CDT
Clear
Temperature
33°F
Dew Point
22°F
Humidity
64%
Wind
N at 17 mph
Barometer
30.32 in. F
Visibility
10.00 mi.
Sunrise
07:32 a.m.
Sunset
05:48 p.m.
Morning Forecast (7:00am-12:00pm)
Temperatures will range from 29 to 37 degrees with mostly clear skies. Winds will remain steady around 21 miles per hour from the north. No precipitation is expected.
7-Day Forecast
Friday
39°F / 26°F
Sunny
Saturday
44°F / 26°F
Sunny
Sunday
47°F / 28°F
Partly Cloudy
Monday
48°F / 33°F
Light Rain
Tuesday
45°F / 32°F
Scattered Showers
Wednesday
45°F / 32°F
Mostly Cloudy
Thursday
45°F / 32°F
Partly Cloudy
Detailed Short Term Forecast
Issued at 0:56 AM CDT
Friday...Temperatures will range from a high of 39 to a low of 26 degrees with clear skies. Winds will range between 7 and 22 miles per hour from the north. No precipitation is expected.
This Afternoon ...Temperatures will range from 39 to 36 degrees with clear skies. Winds will range between 13 and 22 miles per hour from the north. No precipitation is expected.
This Evening ...Temperatures will range from 33 to 28 degrees with clear skies. Winds will remain steady around 9 miles per hour from the north. No precipitation is expected.
Overnight ...Temperatures will remain steady at 27 degrees with clear skies. Winds will remain steady around 7 miles per hour from the north. No precipitation is expected.
Saturday...Temperatures will range from a high of 44 to a low of 26 degrees with mostly clear skies. Winds will range between 1 and 8 miles per hour from the south. No precipitation is expected.

Assembly passes relaxed wetlands regulation

Feb. 23, 2012 | 0 comments

In another late-night session Tuesday (Feb. 21), the Assembly approved major changes to wetlands regulations to ease restrictions over development in Wisconsin.

The bill passed on a voice vote and now goes to Gov. Scott Walker, who has said he will sign it. The Assembly also unanimously passed legislation Tuesday adding cellphone text messages to the state's no-call list.

The vote Tuesday on the wetlands legislation follows action in the state Senate on Feb. 15, when senators voted, 17-15, to approve the wetlands bill.

Realtors, builders and property rights advocates pushed for the legislation, saying current law hamstrings development. The aim, they said, was to balance environmental interests and the rights of property owners.

But groups such as the Wisconsin Wetlands Association and Trout Unlimited said the changes leaned too heavily toward allowing wetland destruction and would cause long-term harm in many locales.

In a statement, Walker said he looked forward to signing the wetlands bill.

"I support updating regulations related to wetlands and specifically looking at balancing the need for economic growth with the need to protect Wisconsin's pristine natural resources," Walker said.

But Rep. Fred Clark (D-Baraboo) said the bill would keep the Department of Natural Resources from protecting the public interest.

"This bill is a solution in search of a problem," Clark said. "There is not a permitting problem with wetlands in this state."

Wetlands are important for flood control and protecting the ecosystem and are guarded by state and federal laws. The DNR estimates the state has lost millions of acres of wetlands since settlement days, or about half of the total original acreage.

Generally, landowners are required to avoid disturbing such landscapes as much as possible. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will continue to regulate wetlands on navigable waters. But on land, where the state regulates wetlands, the legislation would weaken restrictions.

A key change gives the DNR and landowners the option to consider creating wetlands in a new area - known as mitigation - if it's determined that a project has no place else to go. Mitigation has been an option in the past, but advocates for the change complained it was employed only as a last resort.

Under the bill, developers would not be required to look for suitable sites elsewhere. It also establishes a balancing test that evaluates the economic and environmental effect of a project. Advocates of the bill say the changes would allow the DNR to spend more time on complicated projects.

The Assembly also voted, 94-0, to expand the state's no-call list, which already covers both landlines and cellphones, to include text messages. The bill now goes to Walker.

Reprinted with permission from the Journal Sentinel.

This site uses Facebook comments to make it easier for you to contribute. If you see a comment you would like to flag for spam or abuse, click the "x" in the upper right of it. By posting, you agree to our Terms of Use.

Page Tools

Search

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement