Wautoma, WI
Current Conditions
0:56 AM CDT
Clear
Temperature
63°F
Dew Point
55°F
Humidity
75%
Wind
N at 9 mph
Barometer
29.97 in. F
Visibility
10.00 mi.
Sunrise
05:39 a.m.
Sunset
08:27 p.m.
Evening Forecast (7:00pm-Midnight)
Temperatures will range from 73 to 56 degrees with partly cloudy skies. Winds will range between 11 and 16 miles per hour from the north. No precipitation is expected.
7-Day Forecast
Sunday
73°F / 49°F
Clear
Monday
74°F / 51°F
Partly Cloudy
Tuesday
74°F / 53°F
Scattered Showers
Wednesday
75°F / 53°F
Sunny
Thursday
76°F / 56°F
Sunny
Friday
78°F / 56°F
Scattered Showers
Saturday
77°F / 56°F
Sunny
Detailed Short Term Forecast
Issued at 0:56 AM CDT
Sunday...Temperatures will range from a high of 73 to a low of 49 degrees with mostly clear skies. Winds will range between 10 and 16 miles per hour from the northnorthwest. No precipitation is expected.
Overnight ...Temperatures will range from 54 to 49 degrees with clear skies. Winds will remain steady around 11 miles per hour from the north. No precipitation is expected.
Monday...Temperatures will range from a high of 74 to a low of 51 degrees with partly cloudy skies. Winds will range between 9 and 13 miles per hour from the northwest. No precipitation is expected.
This heifer barn is part of the CALS Marshfield Agriculural Research Station.<br />

This heifer barn is part of the CALS Marshfield Agriculural Research Station.
Photo By Wolfgang Hoffmann

Marshfield Research Station turns 100

March 15, 2012 | 0 comments

MARSHFIELD The Marshfield Agricultural Research Station passed a major milestone on March 12. The station was established 100 years ago on that date when the University of Wisconsin officially took title to 80 acres donated by Wood County and the City of Marshfield. Staff and friends of the station plan to celebrate, but not until it’s a little warmer. They’re planning a centennial event for Aug. 16, along with other activities to chronicle the station’s long list of accomplishments. Over those 100 years the station has hosted a wide variety research on row crops, forages, soil fertility and management, dairy herd management and other topics. It was long the home of landforming research begun to help area farmers cope with the area’s heavy, chronically wet soils. The state soil testing lab was established there 60 years ago, and the superintendent’s house is a model “Tomorrow’s Farm Home Today,” built in the 1950s. The station, which is located nearly dead center in Wisconsin, also draws thousands of visitors each year to field days and other Extension activities. In the 2000s the operation underwent a shift in both location and mission. The university turned part of the original property back the city for an industrial park, and 620 acres were purchased north of town. The new land is the site of new facilities that house a sophisticated dairy research program, conducted in partnership with the USDA’s Dairy Forage Research Center, focused on raising dairy herd replacements and nutrient management. Creating the Marshfield Station was part of a university effort — mandated by the state legislature — to create a network of research farms “located on representative soil types that are materially different than that which obtains at the central station in Madison.” Stations had already been established at Spooner and Ashland, within a decade there would also be operations at Hancock and Sturgeon Bay.

This site uses Facebook comments to make it easier for you to contribute. If you see a comment you would like to flag for spam or abuse, click the "x" in the upper right of it. By posting, you agree to our Terms of Use.

Page Tools

Search

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement