Wautoma, WI
Current Conditions
0:56 AM CDT
Clear
Temperature
64°F
Dew Point
35°F
Humidity
34%
Wind
SE at 16 mph
Barometer
30.20 in. F
Visibility
10.00 mi.
Sunrise
06:07 a.m.
Sunset
07:45 p.m.
Afternoon Forecast (12:00pm-7:00pm)
Temperatures will range from 56 to 63 degrees with clear skies. Winds will remain steady around 17 miles per hour from the south. No precipitation is expected.
7-Day Forecast
Saturday
63°F / 43°F
Partly Cloudy
Sunday
65°F / 44°F
Light Rain
Monday
70°F / 36°F
Scattered Showers
Tuesday
54°F / 33°F
Partly Cloudy
Wednesday
43°F / 33°F
Light Rain
Thursday
57°F / 43°F
Light Rain
Friday
52°F / 29°F
Partly Cloudy
Detailed Short Term Forecast
Issued at 0:56 AM CDT
Saturday...Temperatures will range from a high of 63 to a low of 43 degrees with partly cloudy skies. Winds will range between 9 and 18 miles per hour from the southsoutheast. No precipitation is expected.
This Evening ...Temperatures will range from 60 to 47 degrees with mostly clear skies. Winds will range between 10 and 16 miles per hour from the southeast. No precipitation is expected.
Overnight ...Temperatures will range from 47 to 43 degrees with mostly cloudy skies. Winds will remain steady around 10 miles per hour from the south. No precipitation is expected.
Sunday...Temperatures will range from a high of 65 to a low of 44 degrees with cloudy skies. Winds will range between 2 and 13 miles per hour from the eastsoutheast. 1.14 inches of rain are expected.

State activates dead bird reporting hotline to track West Nile virus

May 9, 2013 | 0 comments

To help track the West Nile virus (WNV) in Wisconsin, state health officials have reactivated the statewide, toll-free Dead Bird Reporting Hotline at 1-800-433-1610.

"Certain dead birds can act as an early warning system for West Nile virus activity in an area," said Dr. Henry Anderson, State Health Officer.

Anderson added, "Finding the virus in birds indicates that West Nile virus is present in the local mosquito population. This knowledge can be helpful in triggering special prevention and insect-control measures."

Anderson said that anyone who sees a dead bird can call the hotline and arrange to have the bird tested for West Nile virus. Hotline staff can answer questions about dead birds and provide information on safe handling and disposal.

People should not handle dead birds with their bare hands but should use gloves or a clean plastic bag to pick up the bird through the bag.

West Nile virus is spread to people by the bite of an infected mosquito. Mosquitoes get infected with WNV by feeding on infected birds and can then transmit the virus to other animals, birds, and humans.

Only one in five people infected with West Nile virus will have symptoms, which begin within three-14 days and typically last a few days.

Symptoms include fever, headache, body aches, swollen lymph nodes or a skin rash on the chest, stomach and back.

In rare cases, West Nile virus can cause severe disease with additional symptoms, including muscle weakness, stiff neck, disorientation, tremors, convulsions, paralysis, coma, and potentially death.

The elderly and people who have received a transplant may be at greater risk of developing severe illness.

People who become ill and think they have West Nile virus infection should contact their healthcare provider for treatment of symptoms.

"The best way to prevent West Nile virus and other mosquito-borne infections is to prevent mosquito bites," said Anderson.

He explains, "Mosquitoes transmitting WNV breed in stagnant water, so it is important to eliminate standing water around homes and workplaces to reduce mosquito breeding sites and the risk of bites. Even small pools formed in any type of outdoor containers that can hold water, such as children's toys, gardening pots, or discarded tires, can be breeding grounds."

The Department of Health Services has monitored the spread of WNV among wild birds, horses, and humans since 2001.

In 2002, the state documented its first human infections, with 52 human cases. This was followed by an average of 10 cases per year from 2003 to 2011. There was a significant increase in WNV illnesses in 2013 compared to previous years, with 57 cases of human WNV infections reported.

For more information on West Nile virus, go to http://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/communicable/ArboviralDiseases/WestNileVirus/Index.htm or http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvbid/westnile/index.htm.

For information regarding mosquito repellents, visit http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvbid/westnile/qa/insect_repellent.htm.

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