Waupaca, WI
Current Conditions
0:35 AM CDT
Cloudy
Temperature
44°F
Dew Point
39°F
Humidity
83%
Wind
N at 5 mph
Barometer
0.00 in. F
Visibility
10.00 mi.
Sunrise
06:53 a.m.
Sunset
06:40 p.m.
Morning Forecast (7:00am-12:00pm)
Temperatures will range from 39 to 48 degrees with partly cloudy skies. Winds will range between 4 and 12 miles per hour from the northeast. No precipitation is expected.
7-Day Forecast
Tuesday
56°F / 39°F
Partly Cloudy
Wednesday
66°F / 49°F
Mostly Cloudy
Thursday
71°F / 50°F
Light Rain
Friday
50°F / 30°F
Scattered Showers
Saturday
45°F / 30°F
Partly Cloudy
Sunday
41°F / 36°F
Light Rain
Monday
58°F / 36°F
Light Rain
Detailed Short Term Forecast
Issued at 0:35 AM CDT
Tuesday...Temperatures will range from a high of 56 to a low of 39 degrees with partly cloudy skies. Winds will range between 4 and 12 miles per hour from the east. No precipitation is expected.
This Afternoon ...Temperatures will range from 51 to 56 degrees with clear skies. Winds will range between 6 and 10 miles per hour from the east. No precipitation is expected.
This Evening ...Temperatures will range from 49 to 44 degrees with partly cloudy skies. Winds will remain steady around 8 miles per hour from the east. No precipitation is expected.
Overnight ...Temperatures will remain steady at 48 degrees with mostly cloudy skies. Winds will remain steady around 7 miles per hour from the east. No precipitation is expected.
Wednesday...Temperatures will range from a high of 66 to a low of 49 degrees with mostly cloudy skies. Winds will range between 4 and 12 miles per hour from the southeast. 0.65 inches of rain are expected.

Rural America posts first-ever loss in population

June 20, 2013 | 0 comments

Across the United States, rural counties are losing population for the first time ever because of waning interest among baby boomers in moving to far-flung locations for retirement and recreation, according to new census estimates released Thursday (June 13).

Long weighed down by dwindling populations in farming and coal communities and the movement of young people to cities, rural America is now being hit by sputtering growth in what were once residential hot spots for baby boomers.

The census estimates, as of July 2012, show that would-be retirees are opting to stay put in urban areas.

Recent weakness in the economy means some boomers have less savings than a decade ago to buy a vacation home in the countryside, which often becomes a full-time residence after retirement.

Cities are also boosting urban living, a potential draw for boomers who may prefer to age closer to accessible health care.

"This period may simply be an interruption in suburbanization, or it could turn out to be the end of a major demographic regime that has transformed small towns and rural areas," said John Cromartie, a geographer at the Agriculture Department who analyzed the data.

About 46.2 million people, or 15 percent of the U.S. population, live in rural counties, which spread across 72 percent of the nation's land area. From 2011 to 2012, those nonmetro areas lost more than 40,000 people, a 0.1 percent drop.

About half under 5 are minorities

In a first, America's racial and ethnic minorities now make up about half of the under-5 age group, reflecting sweeping changes by race and class among young people.

Because of an aging population, non-Hispanic whites last year recorded more deaths than births.

These milestones, revealed in 2012 census estimates Thursday, are the latest signs of a historic shift in which whites will become a minority by 2043.

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