Wautoma, WI
Current Conditions
0:56 AM CDT
Cloudy
Temperature
39°F
Dew Point
35°F
Humidity
86%
Wind
SE at 3 mph
Barometer
30.24 in. F
Visibility
10.00 mi.
Sunrise
07:20 a.m.
Sunset
06:02 p.m.
Evening Forecast (7:00pm-Midnight)
Temperatures will range from 44 to 40 degrees with clear skies. Winds will remain steady around 9 miles per hour from the southeast. No precipitation is expected.
7-Day Forecast
Wednesday
44°F / 40°F
Partly Cloudy
Thursday
49°F / 43°F
Light Rain
Friday
65°F / 43°F
Partly Cloudy
Saturday
59°F / 35°F
Sunny
Sunday
51°F / 35°F
Partly Cloudy
Monday
60°F / 41°F
Light Rain
Tuesday
56°F / 38°F
Scattered Showers
Detailed Short Term Forecast
Issued at 0:56 AM CDT
Wednesday...Temperatures will range from a high of 44 to a low of 40 degrees with partly cloudy skies. Winds will range between 7 and 10 miles per hour from the southsoutheast. No precipitation is expected.
Overnight ...Temperatures will range from 40 to 43 degrees with partly cloudy skies. Winds will remain steady around 8 miles per hour from the south. No precipitation is expected.
Thursday...Temperatures will range from a high of 49 to a low of 43 degrees with cloudy skies. Winds will range between 8 and 10 miles per hour from the south. Less than 1 tenth inch of rain is possible.

Soybean farmers should be on alert

April 22, 2014 | 0 comments

MADISON

With the extreme cold and snow cover in many parts of the country this past winter, many farmers wonder about the weather's impact on disease and weed pressures in the upcoming planting and growing season.

"We do not know how the year will unfold for soybean farmers, but in any case, farmers should be aware of potential yield-robbing diseases and weeds and be prepared to take action," said Shawn Conley, Wisconsin State Soybean and Wheat Extension specialist.

Seedling diseases caused by Pythium, Phytophthora, Phomopsis and Rhizoctonia can be problems immediately. Early-season issues can include seed rots or seedling mortality (damping-off). Conditions that favor the development of early-season seedling issues include wet soil conditions at planting, slow germination and/or slow growth of seedlings, and poor seed quality. Early-season infection can also have a long latent period with symptoms not showing up until reproductive periods (for example, Phytophthoraor "root rot" as most farmers know it).

"Prevention management includes the use of high-quality soybean seed, fungicide seed treatments and resistant varieties," Conley said.

A well-designed weed management plan can be essential in maximizing soybean yields.

"Effective weed control can be vital in minimizing the negative effects from competition for light, water and other essential elements for plants," Conley said. "Reduced weed competition maximizes early-season crop growth rate, which quickens the time to full canopy closure and in turn maximizes intercepted light converted to soybean yield."

An effective weed management plan should include:

·Scouting reports that identifies target weed species so control efforts can be appropriately focused.

·Effective weed control preplanting so soybean seeds have a weed-free seedbed.

·Herbicides, with residual weed control activity, increases the flexibility for the proper timing of postemergence applications. This reduces the number of weeds exposed to postemergence herbicides and reduces the variability in the size of weeds at post-emergence spray timings.

·Rotate herbicide modes of action and tank-mix combinations to delay the increase of weed species that are difficult to control with specific herbicides and delay herbicide resistance.

For specific information on scouting fields for Sudden Death Syndrome, Brown Stem Rot, Soybean cyst nematode and others, check out the Wisconsin Soybean pocket guide available at coolbean.info/library/documents/WI_Soybean_Pocket_Guide.pdf. The pocket guide is made possible in part through checkoff funds of the Wisconsin Soybean Marketing Board.

In addition, Conley provides regular updates on soybean information. Visit www.coolbean.info throughout the growing season for the latest information on soybean issues.

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