Wautoma, WI
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Monday...Temperatures will range from a high of 37 to a low of 32 degrees with cloudy skies. Winds will range between 10 and 17 miles per hour from the east. 0.26 inches of rain are expected. Less than 1 inch of snow is possible.
This Afternoon ...Temperatures will range from 37 to 32 degrees with cloudy skies. Winds will remain steady around 12 miles per hour from the east. Rain amounts of less than a tenth of an inch are expected. Snow accumulation of less than a half inch is predicted.
This Evening ...Temperatures will range from 32 to 34 degrees with cloudy skies. Winds will remain steady around 12 miles per hour from the east. Rain amounts between a tenth and quarter of an inch are predicted. Snow accumulation of less than a half inch is predicted.
Overnight ...Temperatures will remain steady at 34 degrees with cloudy skies. Winds will range between 11 and 17 miles per hour from the northeast. Rain amounts of less than a tenth of an inch are expected.
Tuesday...Temperatures will range from a high of 36 to a low of 31 degrees with mostly cloudy skies. Winds will range between 8 and 19 miles per hour from the northnorthwest. 0.23 inches of rain are expected. 1.00 inch of snow is expected.

New grant will fund additional work to reduce

mastitis, antibiotic use in dairy cattle

March 14, 2013 | 0 comments

Integrating MSU Extension and education programs to reduce mastitis and antimicrobial use in dairy cattle is the aim of a new project led by Michigan State University (MSU) AgBioResearch veterinarian Ron Erskine.

Erskine received a nearly $3 million grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture National Institute of Food and Agriculture (USDA NIFA).

Mastitis typically costs between $300-$600 per infection and adversely affects milk production and animal health.

The five-year grant is a continuation of a cooperative project that has reduced the incidence of mastitis. Erskine said the new grant will help further progress.

"In the past 10 years, there has been slow but steady progress in reducing mastitis, but there is always room to improve," said Erskine, a professor in the MSU College of Veterinary Medicine and an MSU Extension specialist.

The bacteria that cause mastitis are most often transmitted by contact with the milking machine or contaminated hands or materials. Severity can differ dramatically, from mild cases that go untreated to others that require antibiotics and other drugs.

"That brings in another whole set of costs to producers - the cost of the drugs, labor to administer the drugs and issues with discarding the milk because milk from a cow that has been treated with drugs cannot go to market," Erskine explained.

He continued, "If we can find better ways to prevent the disease from occurring, then we won't need to use drugs. That would good for farmers, good for consumers and good for the health of the cow. It's a win-win situation. That's the objective of the USDA project: to prevent mastitis from ever occurring."

Prevention begins in the milking parlor.

"That's where you see the first signs of mastitis. The people doing the milking are the boots on the ground," Erskine said. "If an effort is not made to keep the cows clean, dry and comfortable, all the planning and research in the world does not go anywhere."

Erskine points out that many farms continue to struggle with the adoption of mastitis control practices.

"In particular, the delivery of outreach and education has failed to address producer and employee behaviors and attitudes toward mastitis control," he said.

Another issue is adherence to standardized procedures.

"Most of the time how the protocol gets done is what makes the difference between success and failure in the milking parlor," Erskine said. "We need to redouble efforts on employee training and education on dairy farms and emphasize staying with protocols. It's human nature for people to go through training and then drift away from the protocol. We are going to seek ways in the dairy farm community to keep protocols in place and not have people drift away from the proper procedures."

Another factor in efforts to reduce mastitis is that the U.S. dairy industry is increasingly diverse in herd size and housing, labor and management models.

"We need to develop and deliver Extension-based programs that will overcome behavioral barriers and have the flexibility to address the diversity of the U.S. dairy industry," Erskine explained.

To attain that goal, the researchers plan to develop and test a quality milk audit tool and intervention process for dairy operations, develop and test a quality milk specialist certification program, and then evaluate the impact of the audit interventions on dairy farms.

Other MSU researchers involved in the project are AgBioResearch scientists Loraine Sordillo, professor and holder of the Meadow Brook Chair of Farm Animal Health and Well-being in the College of Veterinary Medicine, and Christopher Wolf, professor of agricultural, food and resource economics; Andres Contreras, College of Veterinary Medicine; Ruben Martinez,

Jean Kayisinga, Marizel Davila and William Escalante, Julian Samora Research Institute in the Department of Sociology; Philip Durst and Stan Moore, dairy Extension educators; and Bonnie Bucqueroux, School of Journalism. Researchers from Pennsylvania, Mississippi and Florida are also involved, along with an advisory panel made up of dairy producers, private veterinarians and dairy industry members from the United States, Canada and Ireland.

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