Wautoma, WI
Current Conditions
0:56 AM CDT
Cloudy
Temperature
56°F
Dew Point
36°F
Humidity
47%
Wind
SSE at 7 mph
Barometer
30.26 in. F
Visibility
10.00 mi.
Sunrise
07:20 a.m.
Sunset
06:02 p.m.
Afternoon Forecast (12:00pm-7:00pm)
Temperatures will range from 48 to 55 degrees with clear skies. Winds will remain steady around 9 miles per hour from the southeast. No precipitation is expected.
7-Day Forecast
Wednesday
55°F / 40°F
Partly Cloudy
Thursday
49°F / 43°F
Light Rain
Friday
65°F / 43°F
Partly Cloudy
Saturday
56°F / 36°F
Sunny
Sunday
55°F / 36°F
Light Rain
Monday
64°F / 45°F
Light Rain
Tuesday
56°F / 35°F
Scattered Showers
Detailed Short Term Forecast
Issued at 0:56 AM CDT
Wednesday...Temperatures will range from a high of 55 to a low of 40 degrees with partly cloudy skies. Winds will range between 7 and 11 miles per hour from the southsoutheast. No precipitation is expected.
This Evening ...Temperatures will range from 47 to 40 degrees with clear skies. Winds will remain steady around 9 miles per hour from the southeast. No precipitation is expected.
Overnight ...Temperatures will range from 40 to 43 degrees with mostly cloudy skies. Winds will remain steady around 8 miles per hour from the south. No precipitation is expected.
Thursday...Temperatures will range from a high of 49 to a low of 43 degrees with mostly cloudy skies. Winds will range between 2 and 10 miles per hour from the south. 0.36 inches of rain are expected.

Hay theives a problem

for Missouri farmers

Dec. 6, 2012 | 0 comments

As if it's not bad enough that Missouri farmers are trying to survive the worst drought in decades, now many of them are facing a new problem that's costing them big bucks.

Missouri Farm Bureau president Blake Hurst says thieves are actually targeting hay that has been left out in fields prior to being harvested, hauling them off and selling the valuable commodity.

"Of course, no one brands their hay, so if you hook onto it with your tractor or your pickup and make it out the gate, then it's impossible to prove where the hay came from," Hurst said.

With winter approaching and grass dying out, the price for fresh hay to feed livestock is on the rise, and Hurst says that makes unguarded bales a tempting target.

Ironically, it's because of the ongoing drought that fresh hay has become so valuable with the winter season fast approaching.

And it's not just Missouri. This trend is happening in farm states across the country, so much so that some are now putting global positioning trackers inside their bales, in case they're stolen.

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