Wautoma, WI
Current Conditions
0:56 AM CDT
Cloudy
Temperature
34°F
Dew Point
32°F
Humidity
92%
Wind
CM at 0 mph
Barometer
30.39 in. F
Visibility
9.00 mi.
Sunrise
07:20 a.m.
Sunset
06:02 p.m.
Morning Forecast (7:00am-12:00pm)
Temperatures will range from 28 to 45 degrees with partly cloudy skies. Winds will be light from the east. No precipitation is expected.
7-Day Forecast
Wednesday
55°F / 28°F
Partly Cloudy
Thursday
52°F / 35°F
Mostly Cloudy
Friday
62°F / 44°F
Partly Cloudy
Saturday
58°F / 37°F
Sunny
Sunday
57°F / 37°F
Light Rain
Monday
62°F / 49°F
Light Rain
Tuesday
57°F / 36°F
Scattered Showers
Detailed Short Term Forecast
Issued at 0:56 AM CDT
Wednesday...Temperatures will range from a high of 55 to a low of 28 degrees with partly cloudy skies. Winds will range between 2 and 10 miles per hour from the southsoutheast. No precipitation is expected.
This Afternoon ...Temperatures will range from 49 to 55 degrees with clear skies. Winds will range between 6 and 10 miles per hour from the southeast. No precipitation is expected.
This Evening ...Temperatures will range from 46 to 39 degrees with clear skies. Winds will remain steady around 9 miles per hour from the southeast. No precipitation is expected.
Overnight ...Temperatures will range from 38 to 35 degrees with partly cloudy skies. Winds will remain steady around 7 miles per hour from the south. No precipitation is expected.
Thursday...Temperatures will range from a high of 52 to a low of 35 degrees with mostly cloudy skies. Winds will range between 1 and 12 miles per hour from the south. Less than 1 tenth inch of rain is possible.
University of Wisconsin-Madison students brought the competition hot rod that they designed to an open house at United Wisconsin Grain Producers’ ethanol plant at Friesland last week. The car is designed to burn a combination of ethanol and biodiesel.<br />

University of Wisconsin-Madison students brought the competition hot rod that they designed to an open house at United Wisconsin Grain Producers’ ethanol plant at Friesland last week. The car is designed to burn a combination of ethanol and biodiesel.
Photo By Gloria Hafemeister

Hot rod efficiently uses ethanol

Nov. 1, 2012 | 0 comments

"Ethanol is a higher octane fuel and, when done correctly, energy efficiency can be captured," says Glen Bower, automotive faculty advisor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Bower oversees five different undergraduate student projects involving the use of biodiesel and ethanol in engines.

He and some of his students were at the recent open house at United Wisconsin Grain Producers (UWGP) ethanol plant to demonstrate the competition hot rod designed by the students. The car's engine is designed to run on a combination of biodiesel and ethanol.

The vehicle recently placed first in a national competition for economy and acceleration.

Bower said the UW-Madison projects involved combination of business and mechanical engineering, taking into consideration costs of building the engine together with savings in fuel costs, engine efficiency, speed and engine endurance.

He described how the UW-Madison hybrid vehicle team works with the UW-Madison Engine Research Center to test implementations of Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) engines developed in the mechanical engineering department.

RCCI is a dual-fuel compression-ignition engine low-temperature combustion (LTC) strategy that uses in-cylinder fuel blending with at least two fuels of different reactivity and multiple injections to control in-cylinder fuel reactivity to optimize combustion phasing, duration and magnitude.

Bower estimates that, using RCCI, the team vehicles emit 75 percent fewer greenhouse gases.

"You can't eliminate friction," he said, "but we're getting pretty close to the maximum amount of mechanical energy we can get from breaking a chemical bond."

Meanwhile the university's Baja Team is getting hands-on experience applying what they have learned to real-world problem solving situations. This is accomplished by designing and building a prototype single-seat off-road vehicle.

Students learn about the design process and manufacture components for the car.

At the end of the year, the car is competed against projects from other schools from around the country.



ETHANOL in race cars

Tom Buis, CEO of Growth Energy, and a former National Farmers Union president, also talked about the benefits of ethanol fuel, particularly in the racing industry.

While most people think of burning rubber and the smoke of racing fuel when they watch the cars fly around the track, times are changing. NASCAR has run more than three million miles on E15 fuel, a fuel blended with 15 percent ethanol.

In order to increase awareness of ethanol and dispel myths about the renewable domestic fuel, Growth Energy and the National Corn Growers Association formed the American Ethanol partnership with NASCAR in 2011. Over the past two seasons NASCAR has been powered by a fuel comprised of 15 percent ethanol, made from American-grown corn.

The durability and high performance capabilities of E15 have been continuously proven while racing the rigorous conditions.

Other speakers at the day-long event hosted by UWGP talked about the benefits of ethanol to communities, farmers and the environment.

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