Wautoma, WI
Current Conditions
0:59 AM CDT
Rain
Temperature
54°F
Dew Point
54°F
Humidity
100%
Wind
NNE at 14 mph
Barometer
30.02 in. F
Visibility
1.25 mi.
Sunrise
05:18 a.m.
Sunset
08:31 p.m.
Morning Forecast (7:00am-12:00pm)
Temperatures will range from 56 to 51 degrees with cloudy skies. Winds will range between 14 and 18 miles per hour from the north. Rain amounts between a tenth and quarter of an inch are predicted.
7-Day Forecast
Saturday
63°F / 38°F
Scattered Showers
Sunday
61°F / 37°F
Partly Cloudy
Monday
63°F / 41°F
Sunny
Tuesday
68°F / 41°F
Sunny
Wednesday
74°F / 48°F
Partly Cloudy
Thursday
82°F / 58°F
Light Rain
Friday
75°F / 58°F
Rain
Detailed Short Term Forecast
Issued at 0:59 AM CDT
Saturday...Temperatures will range from a high of 63 to a low of 38 degrees with partly cloudy skies. Winds will range between 12 and 18 miles per hour from the northnortheast. 0.17 inches of rain are expected.
This Afternoon ...Temperatures will range from 58 to 63 degrees with cloudy skies. Winds will remain steady around 16 miles per hour from the north. No precipitation is expected.
This Evening ...Temperatures will range from 59 to 43 degrees with mostly clear skies. Winds will range between 12 and 16 miles per hour from the northeast. No precipitation is expected.
Overnight ...Temperatures will range from 41 to 38 degrees with mostly clear skies. Winds will remain steady around 13 miles per hour from the north. No precipitation is expected.
Sunday...Temperatures will range from a high of 61 to a low of 37 degrees with partly cloudy skies. Winds will range between 6 and 15 miles per hour from the northeast. Less than 1 tenth inch of rain is possible.
ARS ecologist Matt Moore has found that vegetated drainage ditches can be a low-cost way for farmers to capture pesticides and excess nutrients in runoff from fields.<br />

ARS ecologist Matt Moore has found that vegetated drainage ditches can be a low-cost way for farmers to capture pesticides and excess nutrients in runoff from fields.

Drainage ditches canhelp clean up field runoff

Jan. 10, 2013 | 0 comments

Vegetated drainage ditches can help capture pesticide and nutrient loads in field runoff, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists report.

These ditches - as common in the country as the fields they drain - give farmers a low-cost alternative for managing agricultural pollutants and protecting natural resources.

Agricultural Research Service (ARS) ecologist Matt Moore at the agency's National Sedimentation Laboratory in Oxford, MS, and his colleagues conducted the research. ARS is USDA's chief intramural scientific research agency.

Until recently, the primary function of many edge-of-field ditches was to provide a passage for channeling excess water from crop fields. Many farmers controlled ditch vegetation with trimming or dredging to eliminate plant barriers that could impede the flow of runoff.

But in one of Moore's first studies, he evaluated the transport and capture of the herbicide atrazine and the insecticide lambda-cyhalothrin for 28 days in a 160-foot section of a vegetated agricultural drainage ditch in Mississippi.

One hour after he started a simulated runoff event, 61 percent of the atrazine and 87 percent of the lambda-cyhalothrin had transferred from the water to the ditch vegetation.

At the end of the ditch, runoff pesticide concentrations had decreased to levels that were generally non-toxic to downstream aquatic fauna.

Moore also conducted work in California and determined that vegetated drainage ditches helped mitigate pesticide runoff from tomato and alfalfa fields.

As a result, USDA's Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) state office in California included vegetated agricultural drainage in their Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP).

This meant farmers who installed the ditches could be reimbursed for up to 50 percent of the cost. Moore's research also contributed to the decision by NRCS managers in Mississippi to include vegetated agricultural drainage ditches in the state's EQIP.

The research was published in Ecological Engineering, Environmental Pollution, Journal of Environmental Quality, and elsewhere.

Read more about Moore's studies in the January 2013 issue of Agricultural Research magazine.

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