Wautoma, WI
Current Conditions
0:56 AM CDT
Clear
Temperature
58°F
Dew Point
53°F
Humidity
83%
Wind
NNW at 6 mph
Barometer
30.01 in. F
Visibility
10.00 mi.
Sunrise
05:39 a.m.
Sunset
08:27 p.m.
Evening Forecast (7:00pm-Midnight)
Temperatures will range from 73 to 56 degrees with partly cloudy skies. Winds will range between 11 and 16 miles per hour from the north. No precipitation is expected.
7-Day Forecast
Sunday
73°F / 49°F
Clear
Monday
74°F / 51°F
Partly Cloudy
Tuesday
74°F / 53°F
Scattered Showers
Wednesday
75°F / 53°F
Sunny
Thursday
76°F / 56°F
Sunny
Friday
78°F / 56°F
Scattered Showers
Saturday
77°F / 56°F
Sunny
Detailed Short Term Forecast
Issued at 0:56 AM CDT
Sunday...Temperatures will range from a high of 73 to a low of 49 degrees with mostly clear skies. Winds will range between 10 and 16 miles per hour from the northnorthwest. No precipitation is expected.
Overnight ...Temperatures will range from 54 to 49 degrees with clear skies. Winds will remain steady around 11 miles per hour from the north. No precipitation is expected.
Monday...Temperatures will range from a high of 74 to a low of 51 degrees with partly cloudy skies. Winds will range between 9 and 13 miles per hour from the northwest. No precipitation is expected.
The 60x148-foot Tri County Produce Auction Coop barn has successfully provided a market for produce growers since it opened in April 2009. The cooperative is now adding another 100 feet on to the building to increase sales space. The sale barn is located between Dalton and Kingston on County Highway H. Here, with a late planting season, auctioneer Terry Dickinson is selling lots of plants during the auction barn’s first sale of the season, April 23.

The 60x148-foot Tri County Produce Auction Coop barn has successfully provided a market for produce growers since it opened in April 2009. The cooperative is now adding another 100 feet on to the building to increase sales space. The sale barn is located between Dalton and Kingston on County Highway H. Here, with a late planting season, auctioneer Terry Dickinson is selling lots of plants during the auction barn’s first sale of the season, April 23. Photo By Gloria Hafemeister

Cooperative formed to help increase sales of home-grown produce

May 2, 2013 | 0 comments

The Tri-County Produce Auction Coop is a wholesale produce auction supplied with fresh fruits and vegetables, flowers and bedding plants by local growers.

Harley Bontrager, the coop's first president of the five-person board of directors, and other area families formed the cooperative as a way to increase sales of the produce and goods raised on their area farms.

Wisconsin is blessed with many flower, fruit and vegetable growers like the Bontragers. They who are really good at what they do, but even though they maintain a very high quality, often the weak link in the chain between the grower and the consumer is the farmer's inexperience in the marketing arena.

The coop built an auction barn in the winter of 2009 that is set up to make it convenient for potential buyers to look over the offerings and for area growers to bring their products for sale.

The steel building is 60x148 feet with a 12-foot overhang all along the side. There are loading docks and over-head doors on the sides. Now the cooperative auction has been so successful that they are adding on to the building.

They have also changed the layout and the auctioneer winds around the building, auctioning off lots. Instead of sitting in rows of chairs near the sales ring, buyers move from one lot to the next to make their purchases.

Those who use the coop auction see it as the fairest way to purchase fresh produce as prices are controlled in a true supply and demand environment. It is a great market for wholesale buyers such as roadside stands, grocery stores, and restaurants. Small lots are also sold for anyone interested in household consumption or canning.

Anyone who grows produce within 100-mile radius of the auction barn, whether a large commercial grower or just a gardener with surplus produce, is considered a local grower. Other growers are welcome to consign but it will not be promoted as "local."

Last week the auction was filled with buyers looking for potted plants to market in their convenience stores and roadside stands. It was the first auction of the season and temperatures were cold but the buyers were enthusiastic, knowing warmer weather will come soon.

The cooperative has set and enforces packaging to keep the product as uniform as possible. Consignors are assigned permanent numbers, enabling buyers to buy more consistency. Now that the cooperative is in its fifth season, many of the consignors have earned a reputation among buyers who come to seek out their product.

Regular auctions continue on Tuesdays and Fridays in May, then move to three times a week in June, July, August and September. They decrease in frequency in October with the final auction October 29.

To get a complete schedule and learn more about buying or selling through the cooperative, contact Marty Griepentrog, order buyer and contact person, at 608-617-9924.

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